Housing

Tax Credits for Developers, Bulldozers for the Poor

"The complete disregard of renters, police harassment of African Americans, and racial disparities in flood protection are evidence of ethnic cleansing by our government " — Monique Harden

Protestors blocked by police outside the New Orleans city council meeting. © 2007 indybay.org

Despite Katrina causing the worst affordable housing crisis since the Civil War, the federal Housing and Urban Development Department (HUD) is spending $762 million in taxpayer funds to tear down over 4600 public housing apartments and replace them with 744 similarly subsidized units—an 82 percent reduction. HUD took over the local housing authority years ago and all decisions are made in Washington D.C. HUD plans to build an additional 1000 market rate and tax credit units, which will still result in a net loss of 2700 apartments to New Orleans. The new apartments will cost an average of over $400,000 each.

Affordable housing is at a critical point along the Gulf Coast. Over 50,000 families still living in tiny FEMA trailers are being systematically forced out. Over 90,000 homeowners in Louisiana are still waiting to receive federal recovery funds from the so-called “Road Home” reconstruction fund. In New Orleans, hundreds of the estimated 12,000 homeless have taken up residence in small tents across the street from City Hall and under the I-10.

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The John Stewart Co.: Enough is enough!

Submitted by admin on Fri, 01/11/2008 - 10:13am
Source: 

by Robert Ewing

Since The John Stewart Co. took over management, residents of Alabama Manor in San Diego are constantly finding notices on their doors and are afraid to leave because of how often their apartments are entered while they’re away. The anxiety has led to deaths, suicide attempts and panic attacks.

Major housing measure set for S.F.'s November ballot

Submitted by admin on Wed, 01/09/2008 - 4:58pm


The San Francisco Board of Supervisors took on two of the city's most intractable problems in its first meeting of the year - and handed victories to a plan to set aside an unprecedented sum of money to finance affordable housing and a measure to streamline enforcement of laws against sleeping in the parks.

Combating Gentrification Through Equitable Development


The Fifth Avenue Committee (FAC) has worked for fifteen years to revitalize the lower Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, building affordable housing, rehabbing dilapidated buildings and training residents to own cooperative businesses in the neighborhood. The success of these efforts has forced them into unanticipated arenas, including a Displacement Free Zone campaign—their fierce effort to defend tenants within the 36-block neighborhood from evictions; and a local and state policy campaign with other New York City organizations to give landlords incentives to keep their tenants in place and to require developers to include affordable housing in market-rate developments.

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Fixin' to Stay (Summer 2002)

 

Anti-Displacement Policy Options & Community Response (Vol.9, No.1)

Fixin' to Stay cover imageGentrification, the wrenching process of neighborhood change, was first named in the 1960s.  The name, however did not acknowledge the permanent erasure that takes place when a community loses its memory.  Gentrification, or urban blight were policy terms that carried social and racial values, as well as a political and economic agenda.  The layered meanings of the language of redevelopment has been understood by many communities that have fought to remain intact.  In San Francisco, those communities and their fights for survival are whispered anthems to community struggle; International Hotel, Yerba Buena, Fillmore.

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