Movement Building

Indigenous Power: A New Energy Economy

"Cleaner renewable energy resources might prove more lucrative for Indian Country than the non-renewable sources that presently dominate tribal economies."

Graphic: Camille LaCapa. Courtesy of Honor the Earth

The U.S. is the wealthiest and most dominant country in the world, yet it can’t keep the lights on in New York City, nor can it provide power in “liberated” Baghdad. Centralized power production based on fossil fuel and nuclear resources has served to centralize political power, to disconnect communities from responsibility and control over energy, and to create a vast wasteful system. We need to recover democracy. And one key element is democratizing power production.

Let’s face it, we are energy junkies. The U.S. is the largest energy market in the world, and we consume one third of the world’s energy resources with five percent of the population. We are undeniably addicted—our economy is based on the burning of dinosaurs and on wasteful production systems. In other words, oil. Ninety-seven percent of the total world oil consumption has been in the past 70 years.

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Fixin' to Stay (Summer 2002)

 

Anti-Displacement Policy Options & Community Response (Vol.9, No.1)

Fixin' to Stay cover imageGentrification, the wrenching process of neighborhood change, was first named in the 1960s.  The name, however did not acknowledge the permanent erasure that takes place when a community loses its memory.  Gentrification, or urban blight were policy terms that carried social and racial values, as well as a political and economic agenda.  The layered meanings of the language of redevelopment has been understood by many communities that have fought to remain intact.  In San Francisco, those communities and their fights for survival are whispered anthems to community struggle; International Hotel, Yerba Buena, Fillmore.

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Where Do We Go from Here? (Summer 2003)

A Look at the Long Road to Environmental Justice   (Vol. 10, No. 1: Summer 2003)

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This issue of Race, Poverty  and the Environment both celebrates the EJ Movement and offers a critique of it. At this critical point in EJ history, RPE takes a big-picture look at the Movement's past, present and future. In the "Looking Back" section, three articles explore the relationship between EJ and the Civil Rights Movement, examining lessons learned from liberation struggles of the 60s and 70s, as well as failures and missteps to avoid. With this hindsight and analysis, the EJ Movement has the potential to be even more powerful and effective than the social change struggles that preceded it. Another article delves into the tensions between EJ and the environmental movement. The section ends with a review of key milestones in the Movement's history.

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